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The Hill Group, Inc. was Commissioned by Energy Innovations Business Council (EIBC) to do a Study on the Impact of Advanced Energy Manufacturing on Michigan’s Economy

Major MI Businesses Unveil Advanced Energy Trade Group, Benchmark Study

LANSING – Michigan companies in the advanced and renewable energy sector today announced the creation of the Energy Innovation Business Council, a new trade group focused on growing Michigan’s advanced energy industry, and unveiled a benchmark study on their sector’s jobs and economic impact.

“EIBC wants to hit the ground running, and we’re excited to highlight the opportunities and jobs in advanced energy manufacturing,” said EIBC President Ed Clemente. “We’re ready to get to work on behalf of an industry that supports more than 20,700 jobs each year. EIBC looks forward to working with all parties to grow this important sector, spark investments and innovation, and create jobs in Michigan.”

To better understand its industry, the EIBC commissioned a study on the impact of advanced energy manufacturing on Michigan’s economy. The “Economic Impact of New Energy Manufacturing in Michigan” report studied real-world data on four sub-sectors at the core of Michigan’s renewable energy sector: wind, solar, biomass and advanced energy storage, including the electric vehicle sector. The findings of the EIBC study, conducted by The Hill Group based in Carnegie, Pa., include:

  • Michigan’s new energy manufacturing sector supports more than 20,700 jobs a year.
    Michigan’s new energy manufacturing industry has an economic impact of $4.9 billion a year.
  • If Michigan’s market share in the new energy sector increased 25 percent, the industry would support nearly 26,000 jobs a year.

“Michigan has an opportunity to deploy our manufacturing and entrepreneurial strengths to build a robust and innovative advanced energy industry right here in the Midwest,” said Roger Cope, chairman of wind turbine manufacturing company Astraeus based in Eaton Rapids. “Advanced Michigan energy is driving technology and development, putting Michiganders back to work and revitalizing Michigan-based manufacturing businesses. Now is the time to step up our game, and that’s EIBC’s goal.”

“Companies like ours and dozens across Michigan have shown that with the right mix of entrepreneurship and pro-active policies, we can revitalize our manufacturing sector and put people back to work,” said Seth Roberts, director of Energy & Climate Change policy for Dow, a leading manufacturer of innovative clean energy technologies, including advanced photovoltaics. “We see firsthand how Michigan manufacturing expertise, technological innovation and existing infrastructure are bringing investments and business to our state. EIBC is a voice for an industry that will be key to Michigan’s economic future.”

“As a voice for advanced energy manufacturing, EIBC is ready to work with all sides to promote strategies that can grow this exciting industry,” said Ann Marie Sastry, co-founder and CEO of Sakti3, an Ann Arbor-based high-tech, advanced automotive battery manufacturing company. “Advanced energy is creating and supporting thousands of jobs in Michigan, including in advanced energy storage and battery technologies. A hundred years ago, Michigan innovation put the world on wheels. Today, Michigan innovation is driving us towards a strong energy future.”

“Our company and many others involved in Michigan’s new energy economy are examples of how good ideas are turned into good businesses every day,” said Paula Wheeler, director of sales and marketing at LED Optical Solutions, a Macomb County company specializing in advanced lighting technology and energy efficiency. “Michigan must sustain this innovation momentum because it’s helping us diversify our manufacturing sector so we can compete in a 21st century global economy.”

“Michigan’s advanced energy and energy efficiency businesses are building our industry from the ground up,” said Dave Simon, president of ilumisys, a Troy-based company focused on next-generation solid-state lighting technology. “These cutting edge energy businesses are being born in basements, garages, research labs, workshops and factories by Michiganders willing to retool, work hard and seize growing opportunities in the advanced energy economy.”

“With its manufacturing prowess, Michigan has an opportunity to position itself as the region of choice for the advanced energy sector, by leveraging an existing core of manufacturers, highly-skilled workforce, and strong industrial supply chains,” said Jordan Pallitto, The Hill Group consultant and an author of the EIBC report. “Development of an agglomeration economy, similar to automobile manufacturing, by leveraging production and intellectual assets could make Michigan the hub of new energy manufacturing. Based on the data, if Michigan’s manufacturers are willing and able to meet market demand, the economic growth described in the EIBC report can become a reality.”

EIBC currently has more than a dozen member companies, ranging from major wind and solar manufacturers to biomass, advanced energy storage and energy efficiency companies, and expects to grow its membership in the near future.

To learn more about EIBC, go to: www.mieibc.org.

To read the full report click here.